2019

  • Emilce Santana *19

    Emilce Santana is a PhD candidate in the Sociology department and the Office of Population Research. Her research interests are race/ethnicity, social stratification, and immigrant integration. Her dissertation uses relationships, ranging from friendships to marriages, to better understand possible mechanisms that influence interactions across ethno-racial boundaries. Emilce also studies the integration experience of U.S. Latinos.

  • Joel Mittleman *19

    As a sociologist and social demographer, I study inequality with a focus on stigmatized youth, particularly children of color and sexual and gender minorities. 

    My research examines how stigmatized children are “policed”—by peers, by teachers, and by the juvenile justice system itself. Substantively, I focus on the determinants and consequences of exclusionary school discipline and peer bullying.

  • Sarah James *19

    At Princeton, I am a Ph.D. Candidate in Sociology and Social Policy and a member of the Office of Population Research. 

    I study the causes and consequences of health disparities, with an emphasis on the family and community environments that foster or impede healthy behaviors among children and adolescents.

  • Leah L. Gillion *19

    Leah L. Gillion is a PhD candidate at Princeton University in the department of sociology and demography and a predoctoral fellow at the University of Pennsylvania in sociology and the populations study center. Her research interests focus on race and ethnicity, social inequality, education, and public policy. Leah’s current project, "Assessing Ideologies, Spatial Polity, and Politics on Education” examines how societal inequality affects educational inequality.

  • Martin Sybblis *19

    Martin’s research examines commercial law in a comparative context. His dissertation focuses on the role of lawyers in the development of commercial law in the British Caribbean post-colonies of Barbados, Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago. Immediately prior to his doctoral studies, Martin served as a consultant to the World Bank; he also practiced law for over seven years, as an Assistant County Attorney (in-house counsel) for Miami-Dade County and an Associate at Bingham McCutchen LLP. Upon graduating from law school, he served as a Law Clerk to United States District Court Judge Marcia G.

  • Nicole Pangborn *19

    Nicole has a BA in Mathematics from Johns Hopkins University and an MPhil in Applied Biological Anthropology from the University of Cambridge. She is interested in gender, social networks, microsociology, and race / ethnicity. Her dissertation combines these interests in an ethnography of an Italian-American community in the suburbs of Providence, Rhode Island.

  • Amanda Cheong *19

    I am a graduate student in the Joint Degree Program in Sociology and Social Policy. My research explores the stratifying effects of legal status with a focus on undocumented immigrants, stateless persons, and refugees. My dissertation examines how access to civil registration operates as a mode by which inequality is reproduced. I am a recipient of a Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowship, and have previously been supported by the Social Sciences & Humanities Research Council of Canada Doctoral Fellowship.

  • Samantha Jaroszewski *19

    A graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and trained in the tradition of the sociology of religion, Sam is in the field conducting mixed methods research for her dissertation project. The dissertation focuses on communities, behaviors, and practices around the genre of games called Fantasy Sports. Using large-scale surveys, in-depth interviews, and ethnographic observations, she begins at the sociotechnical system of Fantasy Sports and examines the larger social, gendered, historical, and organizational stories that this case helps us understand.

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