Courses

Graduate – Fall 2023

Techniques and Methods of Social Science
Subject associations
SOC 503

This is a course on research methods for sociology PhD students. The seminar has four objectives: 1) to review foundational principles of research design and contemporary debates in sociological methodology; 2) to introduce students to the practice of different research methods (e.g., survey research, experiments, in-depth interviews, ethnography) while considering the strengths and limitations of various approaches; 3) to familiarize students with the components of a strong empirical paper and prepare them to identify a topic and data for their empirical paper; and 4) to train students in the conduct of responsible research.

Instructors
Mitchell Duneier
James M. Raymo
Advanced Social Statistics
Subject associations
SOC 504

This course teaches advanced statistical methods for social science in three segments: (1) causal inference, (2) categorical data analysis, and (3) replication analysis. Emphases are on research designs and practical applications rather than statistical theories or computations. Familiarity with basic probability theory, inferential statistics, and linear regression models for continuous dependent variables is assumed.

Instructors
Yu Xie
Research Seminar in Empirical Investigation
Subject associations
SOC 505

Preparation of quantitative research papers based on field experiments, laboratory experiments, survey procedures, and secondary analysis of existing data banks.

Instructors
Dalton Conley
Long-Term Social Change (Half-Term)
Subject associations
SOC 509

This six-week seminar explores the sources and dimensions of long-term change in contemporary society and the agenda for relevant sociological work on those questions. The six sessions focus on the following topics 1) the changing structure of capitalism; 2) climate change; 3) changes in communication and information technology, including the rise of artificial intelligence; 4) changes in population, family structure, and values; 5) immigration, race, and diversity; and 6) democratic breakdown and backsliding.

Instructors
Paul E. Starr
Research Methods in Demography
Subject associations
POP 502 / SOC 532

Source materials used in the study of population; standard procedures for the measurement of fertility, mortality, natural increase, migration, and nuptiality; and uses of model life tables and stable population analysis and other techniques of estimation when faced with inaccurate or incomplete data are studied.

Instructors
Alicia Adsera
James M. Raymo
Limits to Prediction
Subject associations
SOC 555 / COS 598J

Is everything predictable given enough data and powerful algorithms? This seminar explores that question through social science and computer science research in many domains including life trajectories of individuals, geopolitical events, weather, disease outbreaks, social media and, somewhat speculatively, artificial general intelligence. We aim to identify fundamental limits, learn about common pitfalls, and explore policy implications. Coursework is a mix of reading and empirical work tailored to students' backgrounds. The course is designed to facilitate publishable student research in both social science and computer science.

Instructors
Arvind Narayanan
Matthew J. Salganik
Topics in Social Stratification (Half-Term): Urban Sociology
Subject associations
SOC 560 / AAS 561

This course looks at late twentieth and twenty-first century Black urban life in the United States. We analyze the impact of social, political, and economic realities in shaping Black urban communities in the post-Civil Rights Movement era. We read about each of these areas: spatial isolation and ghetto formation; broad political economy in the 1970s and 1980s and its impact on Black communities; and developments in Black politics from electoral politics to Black Lives Matter.

Instructors
Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor
Social Determinants of Health
Subject associations
SPI 565 / SOC 565 / POP 565

Course examines how and why society can make us sick or healthy and how gender, race/ethnicity, wealth, education, occupation and other social statuses shape health outcomes. It looks at the role of social institutions, and environment-society interactions in shaping health outcomes and examines how these factors underlie some of the major causes of illness and death around the world including infant mortality, infectious diseases such as HIV/AIDS, and chronic diseases such as heart disease and cancer. The course draws on historical and cross-cultural material from the U.S. as well as global examples from different countries around the world.

Instructors
Sanyu A. Mojola
Sociological Studies of Inequality (Half-Term)
Subject associations
SPI 590C / SOC 571

This segment of the JDP seminar covers theory and research on social stratification, the major subfield in sociology that focuses on inequality. Course begins by reviewing major theories, constructs, measures, and empirical work on inequality. Weeks two through six focus on institutions that are expected to produce (and reproduce) inequalities, including families, neighborhoods, schools, labor markets, and penal policy.

Instructors
Jennifer L. Jennings
Research Apprenticeship
Subject associations
SOC 599B

The Research Apprenticeship involves faculty assignment to students that lead to the acquisition of new research skills by the student and/or may lead to a joint research project during that semester or in the future. This may include quantitative or qualitative research methods and/or a substantive area of research (i.e. a survey of a literature). It is required during each semester of the first two years of graduate study (A,B,C,D). SOC 599A and 599C are offered in the fall and SOC 599B and 599D are offered in the spring.

Instructors
Adam M. Goldstein

Undergraduate – Fall 2023

Introduction to Sociology (SA)
Subject associations
SOC 101

This course will introduces students to the discipline of sociology (the systematic study of human groups, institutions and societies). Students will learn the major theoretical approaches within the field as well as the diverse research methods used in sociological investigations. These tools will be applied to a wide variety of special topics studied by sociologists, including family, work, education, religion and social movements, as well as dynamics of class, gender, race and ethnic inequalities within and across countries.

Instructors
Kyle Chan
Introduction to Sociology (SA)
Subject associations
SOC 101

This course will introduces students to the discipline of sociology (the systematic study of human groups, institutions and societies). Students will learn the major theoretical approaches within the field as well as the diverse research methods used in sociological investigations. These tools will be applied to a wide variety of special topics studied by sociologists, including family, work, education, religion and social movements, as well as dynamics of class, gender, race and ethnic inequalities within and across countries.

Instructors
Timothy J. Nelson
Police Violence, #BlackLivesMatter, and the Covid-19 Pandemic (CD or SA)
Subject associations
SOC 102

This course will examine the historic moment in which we are living in order to introduce students to the concept of race and discipline of sociology. Students will learn to study systematically how human groups interact with one another and how social networks and a variety of institutions help shape those interactions and outcomes. How are these interactions and outcomes categorized and understood? Where do different people fit into the social categories we use to make sense of our societies, and why? And how are different actors able to transform those spaces in which to fit?

Instructors
Frederick F Wherry
Police Violence, #BlackLivesMatter, and the Covid-19 Pandemic (CD or SA)
Subject associations
SOC 102

This course will examine the historic moment in which we are living in order to introduce students to the concept of race and discipline of sociology. Students will learn to study systematically how human groups interact with one another and how social networks and a variety of institutions help shape those interactions and outcomes. How are these interactions and outcomes categorized and understood? Where do different people fit into the social categories we use to make sense of our societies, and why? And how are different actors able to transform those spaces in which to fit?

Instructors
Frederick F Wherry
American Society and Politics (SA)
Subject associations
SOC 201 / SPI 339

An introduction to the social bases of American politics and the political forces in the shaping of American society. Topics include divisions of class, race, gender, and party; struggles over national identity and immigration; social movements and civic participation; changes in the media; and the uncertain future of American democracy.

Instructors
Paul E. Starr
Introduction to Urban Studies (SA)
Subject associations
URB 201 / SPI 201 / SOC 203 / ARC 207

This course will examine different crises confronting cities in the 21st century. Topics will range from informal settlements, to immigration, terrorism, shrinking population, sprawl, rising seas, affordable housing, gentrification, smart cities. The range of cities will include Los Angles, New Orleans, Paris, Logos, Caracas, Havana, New York, Hong Kong, Dubai among others.

Instructors
M. Christine Boyer
Introduction to Urban Studies (SA)
Subject associations
URB 201 / SPI 201 / SOC 203 / ARC 207

This course will examine different crises confronting cities in the 21st century. Topics will range from informal settlements, to immigration, terrorism, shrinking population, sprawl, rising seas, affordable housing, gentrification, smart cities. The range of cities will include Los Angles, New Orleans, Paris, Logos, Caracas, Havana, New York, Hong Kong, Dubai among others.

Instructors
M. Christine Boyer
Urban Sociology: The City and Social Change in the Americas (SA)
Subject associations
SOC 210 / LAS 210 / URB 210 / LAO 210

By taking a comparative approach, this course examines the role of social, economic, and political factors in the emergence and transformation of modern cities in the United States and selected areas of Latin America. We consider the city in its dual image: both as a center of progress and as a redoubt of social problems, especially poverty. Attention is given to spatial processes that have resulted in the aggregation and desegregation of populations differentiated by social class and race.

Instructors
Patricia Fernández-Kelly
The Sociology of Human Reproduction (SA)
Subject associations
GSS 211 / GHP 311 / SOC 219

Human reproduction is often taken for granted as a merely biological phenomenon, yet reproduction is laden with cultural meaning and import for individuals and for society as a whole. Despite its significance, reproduction is rarely addressed in the Princeton curriculum. This lecture course explores human reproduction from a sociological perspective. It also seeks to introduce students to some of the basic modes of thinking in both sociology and gender and sexuality studies.

Instructors
Elizabeth M. Armstrong
The Sociology of Crime and Punishment (SA)
Subject associations
SOC 222

This course seeks to provide a sociological account of crime and punishment. Why do people commit crime? How should we respond to crime? How has crime policy changed over the past several decades? What are the consequences of recent crime policy? By reading classic and contemporary sociological research, policy analysis, and media coverage, we will explore the themes of crime and punishment in contemporary society.

Instructors
Lynn Chancer
The Sociology of Crime and Punishment (SA)
Subject associations
SOC 222

This course seeks to provide a sociological account of crime and punishment. Why do people commit crime? How should we respond to crime? How has crime policy changed over the past several decades? What are the consequences of recent crime policy? By reading classic and contemporary sociological research, policy analysis, and media coverage, we will explore the themes of crime and punishment in contemporary society.

Instructors
Lynn Chancer
Sociology of Rock (SA)
Subject associations
SOC 224

This course surveys the history and dynamics of rock music using key concepts and perspectives from sociology. It is divided into three sections. Creating looks at the social worlds within which rock music is produced and disseminated, and the components which contribute to its form. Here we look at two case studies: the emergence of rock n roll in the 1950s and the development of punk in the 1970s. Consuming examines rock fandom as individual identity, as part of youth subcultures, and the uses of music in everyday life. Finally, Communing examines local rock music scenes and aspects of live performance.

Instructors
Timothy J. Nelson
Gender and Society: U.S. and Global Perspectives (SA)
Subject associations
SOC 226

What is gender? How and why does it still matter in the 21st century? What might a world where gender does not matter look like? How can social change happen? This course will undertake a sociological examination of the role of gender in society. We will examine how gender shapes our identities, how it shapes our interactions with others, and how it shapes and is shaped by institutions. We will look not only at how our gender privileges us, but also how we are both subject to and participate in producing gender inequality in our everyday lives. The course will draw on material from the U.S as well as countries around the globe.

Instructors
Sanyu A. Mojola
Schooled: Education, Opportunity, and Inequality (SA)
Subject associations
SOC 228 / SPI 220

Who succeeds in school, and why? What do schools teach students, in addition to reading, writing, and arithmetic? What is the role of schools in modern society? How do schools reproduce, interrupt, or legitimate the social order? In this course, you will apply sociological perspectives to the study of education.

Instructors
Jennifer L. Jennings
Visualizing Data (QCR)
Subject associations
SOC 245 / POL 245

Equal parts art, programming, and statistical reasoning, data visualization is critical for anyone who seeks to analyze data. Data analysis skills have become essential for those pursuing careers in policy evaluation, business consulting, and research in fields like public health, social science, or education. This course introduces students to the powerful R programming language and the basics of creating data-analysis graphics in R.

Instructors
Christopher M. Felton
Vikram Ramaswamy
Brandon M. Stewart
Visualizing Data (QCR)
Subject associations
SOC 245 / POL 245

Equal parts art, programming, and statistical reasoning, data visualization is critical for anyone who seeks to analyze data. Data analysis skills have become essential for those pursuing careers in policy evaluation, business consulting, and research in fields like public health, social science, or education. This course introduces students to the powerful R programming language and the basics of creating data-analysis graphics in R.

Instructors
Brandon M. Stewart
Visualizing Data (QCR)
Subject associations
SOC 245 / POL 245

Equal parts art, programming, and statistical reasoning, data visualization is critical for anyone who seeks to analyze data. Data analysis skills have become essential for those pursuing careers in policy evaluation, business consulting, and research in fields like public health, social science, or education. This course introduces students to the powerful R programming language and the basics of creating data-analysis graphics in R.

Instructors
Brandon M. Stewart
Food Studies: Sociological Perspectives (SA)
Subject associations
SOC 249

This seminar will examine social implications of the American food system as it developed during the twentieth century by delving into topics that range from gender, race, and labor to the construction of supermarkets, development of industrial meat production, and the increasing use of biotechnology in food production.

The Western Way of War (HA)
Subject associations
SOC 250

A historical and analytical overview of war focusing on the origins and consequences of organized violence, the experience of battle, the creation and behavior of warriors, and the future of such conflicts.

Instructors
Miguel A. Centeno
Technology and Society (SA)
Subject associations
EGR 277 / SOC 277 / HIS 277

Technology and society are unthinkable without each other, each provides the means and framework in which the other develops. To explore this dynamic, this course investigates a wide array of questions on the interaction between technology, society, politics, and economics, emphasizing the themes such as innovation and regulation, risk and failure, ethics and expertise. Specific topics covered include nuclear power and disasters, green energy, the development and regulation of the Internet, medical expertise and controversy, intellectual property, the financial crisis, and the electric power grid.

Instructors
Mihir E. Kshirsagar
Technology and Society (SA)
Subject associations
EGR 277 / SOC 277 / HIS 277

Technology and society are unthinkable without each other, each provides the means and framework in which the other develops. To explore this dynamic, this course investigates a wide array of questions on the interaction between technology, society, politics, and economics, emphasizing the themes such as innovation and regulation, risk and failure, ethics and expertise. Specific topics covered include nuclear power and disasters, green energy, the development and regulation of the Internet, medical expertise and controversy, intellectual property, the financial crisis, and the electric power grid.

Instructors
Mihir E. Kshirsagar
Gender, Sexuality and Migration (SA)
Subject associations
GSS 297 / SOC 283

This seminar examines how gender and sexuality shape processes of migration. It mainly focuses on the experiences of women. It addresses the constitution of gender and sexuality in the process of migration, analyzes the ways that society disciplines migrants via the control of their gender and sexuality, examines how race factors in these processes, and lastly identifies the ways that migrants utilize gender and sexuality to negotiate the various structural inequalities they confront in the process of migration. This course situates our discussion of gender and sexuality in the state, labor market, and family.

Instructors
Rhacel Salazar Parreñas
Claims and Evidence in Sociology (SA)
Subject associations
SOC 300

This course is an introduction to the logic and practice of social science research. The goal is to provide methodological training that will enable students to design and execute successful independent research projects. We review a range of approaches used by sociologists to answer research questions, including field experiments, surveys, observation, in-depth interviews, and mixed method research.

Instructors
James M. Raymo
Janet A. Vertesi
Claims and Evidence in Sociology (SA)
Subject associations
SOC 300

This course is an introduction to the logic and practice of social science research. The goal is to provide methodological training that will enable students to design and execute successful independent research projects. We review a range of approaches used by sociologists to answer research questions, including field experiments, surveys, observation, in-depth interviews, and mixed method research.

Instructors
Kathryn J. Edin
Filiz Garip
Statistical Methods in Sociology (QCR)
Subject associations
SOC 301

Most research in sociology is quantitative, and it is important for students to be able to critically evaluate published quantitative research. Ideally, students should also be able to conduct empirical research involving statistical methods. This course provides the foundation for both goals. The course focuses specifically on how to determine, apply, and interpret statistical methods appropriate for answering a sociological research question given a particular set of data. Basic probability theory is introduced as a building block of statistical reasoning, and a variety of commonly-used statistical methods are covered in the course.

Instructors
Tod G. Hamilton
Statistical Methods in Sociology (QCR)
Subject associations
SOC 301

Most research in sociology is quantitative, and it is important for students to be able to critically evaluate published quantitative research. Ideally, students should also be able to conduct empirical research involving statistical methods. This course provides the foundation for both goals. The course focuses specifically on how to determine, apply, and interpret statistical methods appropriate for answering a sociological research question given a particular set of data. Basic probability theory is introduced as a building block of statistical reasoning, and a variety of commonly-used statistical methods are covered in the course.

Instructors
Tod G. Hamilton
Sociological Theory (SA)
Subject associations
SOC 302 / CHV 302

This course takes a close look at the foundational texts and critical concepts in the discipline of sociology, from the 19th century classics to contemporary theorists who have inspired important research agendas. Our two main goals will be to a) engage critically with authors and ideas and b) to develop your own 'sociological eye' and theoretical skills. Key authors will include Marx, Durkheim, Weber, Simmel, Dubois, Schutz, Goffman, Bourdieu, Foucault, Butler and Latour. We will put these authors in their historical contexts and also ask how they can be used now to interpret contemporary issues and events.

Instructors
Lynn Chancer
Sociological Theory (SA)
Subject associations
SOC 302 / CHV 302

This course takes a close look at the foundational texts and critical concepts in the discipline of sociology, from the 19th century classics to contemporary theorists who have inspired important research agendas. Our two main goals will be to a) engage critically with authors and ideas and b) to develop your own 'sociological eye' and theoretical skills. Key authors will include Marx, Durkheim, Weber, Simmel, Dubois, Schutz, Goffman, Bourdieu, Foucault, Butler and Latour. We will put these authors in their historical contexts and also ask how they can be used now to interpret contemporary issues and events.

Instructors
John N. Robinson
The Global Ghetto (SA)
Subject associations
GLS 303 / SOC 304 / JDS 304

This seminar traces the "ghetto" and the Holocaust as central concepts in Jewish and Black historiography. The course will divide its time between the Jewish ghetto of Rome and the city of Warsaw, where we will hold classes at the new POLIN Museum. In addition spending time in the ghetto in Italy, students will also visit the Vatican. In Poland, the class will also visit Krakow, where students will explore the intact Jewish quarter dating from the late medieval and early modern period. In comparative perspective, U.S. Black ghettos from World War II to the present will be studied in depth.

Instructors
Mitchell Duneier
Introduction to Quantitative Social Science (QCR)
Subject associations
POL 345 / SOC 305 / SPI 211

Would universal health insurance improve the health of the poor? Do patterns of arrests in US cities show evidence of racial profiling? What accounts for who votes and their choice of candidates? This course will teach students how to address these and other social science questions by analyzing quantitative data. The course introduces basic principles of statistical inference and programming skills for data analysis. The goal is to provide students with the foundation necessary to analyze data in their own research and to become critical consumers of statistical claims made in the news media, in policy reports, and in academic research.

Instructors
Zeyang Yu
Introduction to Quantitative Social Science (QCR)
Subject associations
POL 345 / SOC 305 / SPI 211

Would universal health insurance improve the health of the poor? Do patterns of arrests in US cities show evidence of racial profiling? What accounts for who votes and their choice of candidates? This course will teach students how to address these and other social science questions by analyzing quantitative data. The course introduces basic principles of statistical inference and programming skills for data analysis. The goal is to provide students with the foundation necessary to analyze data in their own research and to become critical consumers of statistical claims made in the news media, in policy reports, and in academic research.

Instructors
Marc Ratkovic
Machine Learning with Social Data: Opportunities and Challenges
Subject associations
SOC 306 / SML 306

This is a class about using the tools of machine learning to study social data. The power of machine learning tools is their applicability around a wide range of tasks. There are huge opportunities for applying these tools to learn and make decisions about real people but there are also important challenges. This course aims to (1) show social scientists and digital humanities scholars the potential of machine learning to help them learn about humans, make policy and help people while also (2) showing computer scientists how a social science research design perspective can improve their work and give them new outlets for their skills.

Instructors
Brandon M. Stewart
Sexuality in Global Contexts (SA)
Subject associations
SOC 311 / GSS 451

Sexuality is fundamental to the organization of society -- both in the U.S. and across the world. Though sexuality carries important personal significance, the understanding of why and how it influences our lives is inextricably woven into a complex, global fabric. The aim of this course is to unravel this fabric and reveal the deeply globalized nature of sexuality in the modern era and how this shapes understandings of sexuality, the sexual identities available to us, and how the state regulates it -- especially from a global, comparative perspective.

Instructors
Kristopher Velasco
Race and Public Policy (SA)
Subject associations
SPI 331 / SOC 312 / AAS 317 / POL 343

Analyzes the historical construction of race as a concept in American society, how and why this concept was institutionalized publicly and privately in various arenas of U.S. public life at different historical junctures, and the progress that has been made in dismantling racialized institutions since the civil rights era.

Instructors
Douglas S. Massey
Race and Public Policy (SA)
Subject associations
SPI 331 / SOC 312 / AAS 317 / POL 343

Analyzes the historical construction of race as a concept in American society, how and why this concept was institutionalized publicly and privately in various arenas of U.S. public life at different historical junctures, and the progress that has been made in dismantling racialized institutions since the civil rights era.

Instructors
Douglas S. Massey
Poverty, by America (SA)
Subject associations
SOC 314 / AAS 379

The United States, the richest country on earth, has more poverty than any other advanced democracy. Why? Why does this land of plenty allow one in eight of its children to go without basic necessities, permit scores of its citizens to live and die on the streets, and authorize its corporations to pay poverty wages? Drawing on history, social-scientific research, and reporting, this seminar will attempt to unravel this question. Weekly, we will discuss a topic central to understanding the causes and consequences of, and solutions to, American poverty. We will take field trips, welcome guests, and collaborate on projects to abolish poverty.

Instructors
Matthew Desmond
Poverty, by America (SA)
Subject associations
SOC 314 / AAS 379

The United States, the richest country on earth, has more poverty than any other advanced democracy. Why? Why does this land of plenty allow one in eight of its children to go without basic necessities, permit scores of its citizens to live and die on the streets, and authorize its corporations to pay poverty wages? Drawing on history, social-scientific research, and reporting, this seminar will attempt to unravel this question. Weekly, we will discuss a topic central to understanding the causes and consequences of, and solutions to, American poverty. We will take field trips, welcome guests, and collaborate on projects to abolish poverty.

Instructors
Matthew Desmond
Capitalism (SA)
Subject associations
SOC 316

A survey of past and present perspectives on the origin, development and social consequences of capitalism, covering various aspects including classical political economy and sociology theories, long-term cycles, revolutions, state actors, the welfare state, imperialism, international trade, international finance, labor relations, consumerism, ecology, neoliberalism and the future of capitalism.

Instructors
Larry Liu
Law, Institutions and Public Policy (SA)
Subject associations
SPI 333 / SOC 326

This course will examine how institutions develop, vary in design, and shape public policy. Law will be a primary focus because it is central to the development of institutions in modern societies and provides the formal means for expressing and fixing policy. The course will cover a wide range of institutions- social, economic, and political- not only in an American context but also in comparative perspective.

Instructors
Paul E. Starr
The Social Meaning of Money (SA)
Subject associations
SOC 350

Money seems to represent the ultimate symbol of economic rationality, a single, impersonal and totally interchangeable medium of exchange. Money is also feared as morally dangerous, replacing personal bonds with cold greed. This seminar will offer a fundamentally different sociological explanation of how money works. Examining different monetary worlds ranging from households and college campuses, to law firms and internet sites, we will explore how our multiple moneys are shaped by cultural meanings, moral concerns, and social relations.

Instructors
Viviana A. Zelizer
Rats, Riots, and Revolution: Housing in the Metropolitan United States (HA)
Subject associations
AAS 350 / URB 350 / SOC 351

This class examines the history of urban and suburban housing in the twentieth century US. We will examine the relationship between postwar suburban development as a corollary to the "underdevelopment" of American cities contributing to what scholars have described as the "urban crisis" of the 1960s. Housing choice and location were largely shaped by discriminatory practices in the real estate market, thus, the course explores the consequences of the relationship between public policy and private institutions in shaping the metropolitan area including after the passage of federal anti-housing discrimination legislation in the late 1960s.

Instructors
Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor
Information Technology and Public Policy (SA)
Subject associations
COS 351 / SPI 351 / SOC 353

This course surveys recurring, high-profile issues in technology policy and law. Each session will explore a challenging topic, including consumer privacy, data security, electronic surveillance, net neutrality, online speech, algorithmic fairness, cryptocurrencies, election security, and offensive operations. The seminar will also cover foundational technical concepts that affect policy and law, including internet architecture, cryptography, systems security, privacy science, and artificial intelligence. Materials and discussion will draw extensively from current events and primary sources.

Instructors
Jonathan Mayer
Sports, Recreation and Society (SA)
Subject associations
SOC 362

In both the U.S. and around the globe, formal and informal sports are a key component of social life. This course will help you become an academically literate consumer of and/or participant in sports. Students will consider their own experiences and compare them to accounts of sports in a variety of different community settings. Our discussions will cover both the individual and social benefits of participation in athletics, as well as the risks and value distortions that sports can entail. Students will leave the course better equipped to appreciate the ethical, social, and political undercurrents of societal debates regarding sports.

Instructors
Sam Trejo
Genomics and Society (SA)
Subject associations
SOC 371

Over the past 20 years, we have witnessed rapid advances in our ability to collect and analyze human DNA. For the first time, social scientists can integrate molecular genetic data into studies of the processes that shape social and behavioral outcomes like education and BMI. How do genes affect a person's chances of developing depression? Do genetic influences vary across environments? What is the difference between race and genetic ancestry? We review the ugly history surrounding genes and social outcomes, introduce the key concepts of molecular genetics, and explore recent discoveries in human genomics and their implications for society.

Instructors
Sam Trejo
Systemic Racism: Myths and Realities (SA)
Subject associations
SOC 373 / AMS 428

This seminar focuses on the structural and institutional foundations of racial discrimination in the United States. It emphasizes the contributions of sociologists, some of whom will participate as invited guests. The course gives a historical overview followed by an investigation of key legislative actions and economic factors inhibiting racial equality. Subsequent topics include migration and immigration; urban development; and residential segregation. The end of the course reviews resistance movements and policies aimed at addressing systemic racism, including restorative justice and reparations.

Instructors
Patricia Fernández-Kelly
Systemic Racism: Myths and Realities (SA)
Subject associations
SOC 373 / AMS 428 / URB 373

This course focuses on the structural and institutional foundations of racial discrimination in the United States. It emphasizes the contributions of sociologists. The course gives a historical overview followed by an investigation of key legislative actions and economic factors inhibiting racial equality. Subsequent topics include migration and immigration; urban development; and residential segregation. The end of the course reviews resistance movements and policies aimed at addressing systemic racism, including restorative justice and reparations.

Instructors
Patricia Fernández-Kelly
Identities: Race, Class, Gender, & Sexuality (SA)
Subject associations
SOC 375

This course will examine our individual and collective identities -- especially as they relate to sexuality, race, gender, and class. We will specifically focus on the social processes that produce these identities, how identities change over time, and the individual and collective anxieties that occur when identities become destabilized. This course will also focus on how power, privilege, and oppression intersect with our identities.

Instructors
Kristopher Velasco
Musical Theatre and Fan Cultures (LA or SA)
Subject associations
HUM 340 / MTD 340 / AMS 440 / SOC 376

Why do people love Broadway musicals? How do audiences engage with musicals and their stars? How have fan practices changed since the 1950s alongside economic and artistic changes in New York and on Broadway? In what ways does "fan of" constitute a social identity? How do fans perform their devotion to a show, to particular performers, and to each other? This class examines the social forms co-created by performers and audiences, both during a performance and in the wider culture. Students will practice research methods including archival research, ethnographic observation, in-depth interviewing, and textual and performance analysis.

Instructors
Elizabeth M. Armstrong
Stacy E. Wolf
Sociology of Climate Change (SA)
Subject associations
SOC 377 / ENV 322

What is the social basis for the production and distribution of carbon emissions, the source of human-induced climate change? Which people, companies, and countries are responsible? On whom do the effects fall? What makes change possible? We examine the institutions that try to govern carbon emissions, with a focus on different types of governments, social movements, and private firms. We consider how these actors are both similar and different across rich and poor countries, and across the global, national, and urban scales. And we debate proposed solutions that rely on the analyses and evidence that we have studied earlier in the course.

Instructors
Benjamin H. Bradlow
Sociology of Climate Change (SA)
Subject associations
SOC 377 / ENV 322 / URB 322

What is the social basis for the production and distribution of carbon emissions, the source of human-induced climate change? Which people, companies, and countries are responsible? On whom do the effects fall? What makes change possible? We examine the institutions that try to govern carbon emissions, with a focus on different types of governments, social movements, and private firms. We consider how these actors are both similar and different across rich and poor countries, and across the global, national, and urban scales. And we debate proposed solutions that rely on the analyses and evidence that we have studied earlier in the course.

Instructors
Benjamin H. Bradlow